Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ   Website Home Page

Board index » The Japanese Sword Craftsmens Forum » Tosho




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:09 am
Posts: 13
Location: Argentina
This is a shinken that we have finished.
Have a blade with Clay Coating differential Hardening W1 Steel (1% carbon alloy)
Thanks for looking.
Regards

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Mon May 02, 2011 7:46 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 12:04 am
Posts: 130
Location: London/Berkeley/Tokyo
Hello,

Would you like some constructive critique from the various members of the forum?

Best

_________________
Paul Martin
www.thejapanesesword.com
Twitter
Facebook


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Mon May 02, 2011 2:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:09 am
Posts: 13
Location: Argentina
admin wrote:
Hello,

Would you like some constructive critique from the various members of the forum?

Best

Hi Paul
Ths is the idea ...
As long as not too cruel and help us to grow as Swordmakers
This sword today has its owner: a happy warrior lady...
(sorry for my poor english)
Regards


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 6:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:43 pm
Posts: 76
Hi Guys,

On the forging, difficult to say anything as I am not a specialist.

One observation, the groove (Bohi) is misplaced, It should be centered on the shinogi ji leaving a small border with both the shinogi (ridge line) and the mune (back of the blade)

Here is an example on an Enju blade


Attachments:
kissaki5.jpg
kissaki5.jpg [ 116.34 KiB | Viewed 8902 times ]
Enju1.jpg
Enju1.jpg [ 186.11 KiB | Viewed 8902 times ]
Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 3:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 12:04 am
Posts: 130
Location: London/Berkeley/Tokyo
Hi Guys,

I am sure the members of the forum will be prepared to give you constructive criticism without being nasty. However, future blades and koshirae will have to made completely with traditional Japanese type materials (homemade oroshi-gane, etc) and techniques, otherwise we will have everyone posting their mass produced blades here.

In addition to Jean's comments, the ratio between the ha and the shinogi, compared to the shinogi and the mune-kado looks not quite right. Between the shinogi and the mune-kado should be roughly one third of the width of the blade. Also, the nakago does not seem to follow the overall curvature of the blade.

You must ask yourself some questions. What tradition I am trying to encapsulate into my work, and what period's shape? My advice would be to choose a school or smith, study their work (but retain your own character), then aim at a certain period's shape that works for iaido, etc. i.e. Keicho shinto, or Kanbun. Also, we would like to see some hada, some hues and textures of your steel, and the activities that you can produce in your hamon.

For detailed criticism, I would post the different parts into the other craftsmen forums. So blades only here, koshirae in the other parts. I hope that you don't feel disparaged, but invigorated to get closer to the real thing. Ganbatte kudasai.

Best

_________________
Paul Martin
www.thejapanesesword.com
Twitter
Facebook


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 2:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 1:15 pm
Posts: 152
Location: at San Francisco in California
Mr Fontenia -

I am no craftsman so I will post my remarks here but will look for any postings in the other forums.

First off let me say that thats my kind of lady if this is her sword! Props to her for showing her style.

It is easy to be a critic so please understand that while I criticize your work I am in no way capable of producing anything this good.

As has been pointed out the Hi is poorly placed - the shinogi seems to have disappeared altogether - also the shape as Paul pointed out, looks odd like the nakago straightens out rather than curves, may be the photos I do not know. The nakago also looks to be a little overlong but again may be the photo. I like the large-ish kissaki and the hints of hamon that we see look promising.

For the koshirae most glaring to my eye is the width of the fuchi as compared to the koiguchi, the open end of the scabbard. I was always told that the line of the handle should flow thru the tsuba and right down the scabbard, there should be no "step up" where the saya is noticibly wider than the fuchi. This is so common in Iaito, swords for practice, these days that I think many do not know or understand the importance of getting this right.

The fuchi looks a bit clumsy as does the silver mon but again suggests a knowledge of the materials I could never demonstrate. The wrap, Tsukamaki, looks excellent if it is tight enough for daily use, a very nice piece of work there from what can be seen. Do let us know if you post better photos of the wrap in the tsukamaki-shi forum. I would point out the "step down" that can be seen where the tsukaito appears wider that the fuchi.

Finally the tsuka is quite long - understandable if this piece is for say tameshi-giri but cannot imagine the young lady that would need such a tsuka for Iai.

All that said I am still impressed, quite promising I hope we do see more of your work on the forum somewhere,
Obrigado
-t

_________________
Thomas C Helm
Contributing Editor NCJSC
www.ncjsc.org
www.toryu-mon.com


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Fri May 06, 2011 5:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:09 am
Posts: 13
Location: Argentina
Thank you for your comments, suggestions and point us the opportunity to improve.
Have been very moderate :)
Sometimes the "know what to do" or the "how to do it" is so easy, but make it happen is not easy.
Since 15 years ago we are progressing on this route...
and today we are left without teachers :(
Unfortunately in my country there are not many people with the skills needed to guide or to learn.
There is simply just no.
In this 15 years if we had three (3!) real nihonto (mumei) and a half dozen real tsuba in our hands a lot!
Internet now gives us the possibility to contact people with the experience and the know-how necessary for to keep growth in our work.
My brother and I discussed about up load our work here, but we finally decided and no regrets.
We are very pleased to participate in this forum, which creates a space where we can read your comments about our work.
Thank you very much Mr. Paul, Mr. Toryu and Mr. Jean (ah, and when you return to Argentina, you are welcome to our shop)
Best regards


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Fri May 06, 2011 7:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 8:38 am
Posts: 98
Location: Canadian Arctic
I think you have made a very good start gentlemen. I would like to know more on how you made the blade. The fittings are another thing and you will find experience the best teacher in refining your work in that respect. The same is true with the bladework. I suspect you are using a lost metal process on homogenous steel billets and not forging the blade. Is this correct? Using two different steels and forge-welding them together and subsequent folding will provide a more traditional jihada (similar to damascene blades, but, not quite). I believe you can get billets made in this fashion from certain forges. I did notice how it had a good polish and the lines were alright, here again each to follow will be better yet. I admire your skills. John


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Sat May 07, 2011 11:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:43 pm
Posts: 76
Quote:
(ah, and when you return to Argentina, you are welcome to our shop)


Con mucho gusto, un abrazo de Francia


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sword from Argentina
 Post Posted: Wed May 11, 2011 3:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:09 am
Posts: 13
Location: Argentina
Stuart wrote:
I think you have made a very good start gentlemen. I would like to know more on how you made the blade. The fittings are another thing and you will find experience the best teacher in refining your work in that respect. The same is true with the bladework. I suspect you are using a lost metal process on homogenous steel billets and not forging the blade. Is this correct? Using two different steels and forge-welding them together and subsequent folding will provide a more traditional jihada (similar to damascene blades, but, not quite). I believe you can get billets made in this fashion from certain forges. I did notice how it had a good polish and the lines were alright, here again each to follow will be better yet. I admire your skills. John

Dear John
We make all the blades by forging and we use "homogeneous" steel (W1: the best hamon) or an amassed of two steels from in a billet as the Tanto in the photo that I loaded.
In the case of this Tanto, we took on average between 58 and 60 RC hardness in the Hamon área.
The construction of this blade started from a pack of 40 layers of 1070 and 1095 steel (20 of 1070 and 20 of 1095, 2 mm everyone)
After, the billet was stretched, folded and welded till 1080 layers
The Tanto looks like this because it is a scan, also layers that obvious, but so much more you notice the details of the hamon.
I hope you have enjoyed.
Image
Image
Image
Image
http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/6686/samurai1p.jpg
http://img846.imageshack.us/img846/5889/samurai2.jpg
http://img820.imageshack.us/img820/6436/samurai3.jpg
http://img190.imageshack.us/img190/8239/samurai4u.jpg
Regards


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

Board index » The Japanese Sword Craftsmens Forum » Tosho


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron